poetry

Finally.

Advice on Submitting Your Poems

Photo by  Frame Harirak  on  Unsplash

For those who are looking for a little bit of guidance in finding a home for their poems, I have dusted off and reposted an awesome resource. Check out “How To Submit Poems To Literary Journals And Magazines” at Writer’s Relief. Follow these seven steps and you’ll find your work in the limelight in quick fashion.

http://writersrelief.com/2010/01/11/how-to-submit-poems-to-literary-journals-and-magazines/?fbclid=IwAR0dNHqY4hVS6MmrpmWSdFLpDo1sbr00EBYK9J_h8NSgNokW0XwXEYTt0hQ

How To Feel The Funk

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It’s been a long time, I shouldn’t have left you…but I’m now back on the blogging horse, ready to ride again.

Though I’ve been silent on here, I’ve been showcasing my voice all over the place. I’ll slowly catch everyone up on my latest publications and new projects in the next few weeks on this blog.

First up – I want to announce my new-ish micro-chapbook of six poems called “How to Feel the Funk” published by the Origami Poems Project. So get down, get into the groove, and go get your electronic copy of this micro-chap here.

https://www.origamipoems.com/poets/366-adrian-s-potter

What I Find Fascinating About Poetry

When done right, poetry teaches you without forcing you to learn.

A great poem doesn't try to attach a bridle to the reader and lead them through a desert like a cowboy would his horse. A great poem invites a reader to ride alongside the writer, to travel with them, allows a reader to learn from their insight and see their world via metaphor and musicality.

So…what do you find fascinating about poetry?

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National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month, which presents a great opportunity to infuse your poetry writing and reading activities with new energy. In case any of you might be wanting to do that, I present the following sources for poetic inspiration:

National Poetry Month Homepage: https://www.poets.org/national-poetry-month/home

2018 Poetic Asides PAD (Poem-A-Day) Challenge: http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/2018-april-pad-challenge-guidelines

30 Days, 30 Poems Challenge: https://www.tweetspeakpoetry.com/2018/03/17/30-days-30-poems-challenge-national-poetry-month/

10 New Poetry Collections to Read During National Poetry Month: https://lithub.com/10-new-poetry-collections-to-read-during-national-poetry-month/

NaPoWriMo (National Poetry Writing Month): http://www.napowrimo.net/

30 Ways to Celebrate National Poetry Month: https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/learning/issues_in_depth/30PoetryIdeas.html

Poetry Super Highway Prompt-A-Day for National Poetry Month: http://poetrysuperhighway.com/psh/ (check the tab for "special projects" and then "a poetry writing prompt a day" to locate the prompts and other info)

Good luck and positive vibes as you celebrate National Poetry Month!

Minnesota’s Best Emerging Poets.

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I am happy to announce that I’m one of 110 up-and-coming poets who have been included in this anthology of Minnesota’s Best Emerging Poets compiled by Z Publishing. Maybe one day I’ll stop being emerging and finally become established. That's the goal, at least.

https://www.zpublishinghouse.com/collections/modern-anthologies/products/minnesotas-best-emerging-poets?variant=5583381495838

Try Try Again?

Check out this very informative Q&A between Terrapin Books publisher Diane Lockward and author Karen Paul Holmes on resubmitting a previously rejected poetry-book manuscript.

Since I have several manuscripts written but no book deal yet, I struggle with the question of whether I should bother sending a book that’s been retooled back to the same publisher. This Q&A hit home and gave me some great insight on this subject.

http://dianelockward.blogspot.com/2018/01/to-resubmit-or-not-to-resubmit-that-is_97.html

Triggerfish Critical Review.

Triggerfish is an online literary journal dedicated to the “why” of poetry, seeking to understand and illuminate this process, to say that it is possible to make qualitative judgments and distinctions about the substance of poetry.

I’m excited to announce that Issue 19 of Triggerfish includes two of my poems (with audio!) – “Tell Them a Story” and “I Am Hip Hop.” You can check these poems out at the links below. I appreciate the chance to contribute to Triggerfish! It is wonderful to be included amongst the talented writers and artists in this issue.

http://triggerfishcriticalreview.com/adrian-s-potter-tell-them-a-story/

http://triggerfishcriticalreview.com/adrian-s-potter-i-am-hip-hop/

“Nothing” at The Voices Project

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The Voices Project is a non-judgmental venue for women, and also men, to express their personal stories and observations through poetry to promote social change. They are dedicated to helping others feel empowered through self-expression. Recently, they published my poem “Nothing” on their website. Big thanks to the editors at The Voices Project for allowing me to contribute.

http://www.thevoicesproject.org/poetry-library/nothing-by-adrian-s-potter

Bacopa Literary Review.

Big thanks to the folks at the Bacopa Literary Review for including three of my poems in their 2017 issue, including “This Is Not a Protest Poem,” which won Honorable Mention in their annual contest. I appreciate the chance to contribute!

Here's the Amazon.com link to Bacopa Literary Review 2017 if you are interested in checking it out.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1973979454/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1504416981&sr=1-1&keywords=Bacopa+Literary+Review&pldnSite=1

Putting it together…

If you’re looking for guidance on developing a book of poetry, check out this blog post in which Marilyn McCabe shares everything she can think of on the subject of putting together a manuscript of poems. It’s easy to read and has some solid advice. It just might inspire you to piece together your poetic masterpiece.

https://marilynonaroll.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/putting-together-a-manuscript-of-poems-everything-i-can-think-of-a-megablog/

You mean poetry can pay?

Yes it can, per Erika Dreifus’ article "Making Poetry Pay: Five Ways to Increase Your Poetry Income" on the Association of Writers & Writing Programs website. She provides some simple – almost obvious – guidelines for turning your poetry practice into cash.

One of these tips – aiming for 100 rejections per year – is already a part of my current writing endeavors. Still, I plan on studying all of this blueprint and incorporating the other action items soon.

https://www.awpwriter.org/magazine_media/writers_notebook_view/61/making_poetry_pay_five_ways_to_increase_your_poetry_income

Portage 2017.

Based in Waukesha, Wisconsin, Portage is an online literary journal run and edited by undergraduate students of Carroll University. Portage publishes literary writing, art, music, film, and cultural commentary from the upper Midwest.

I’m excited to announce that the 2017 edition of Portage includes three of my poems – “The Mistake Poem”, “Living is the New Dying”, and “Obvious Dangers.” You can check these poems out at the link below. I appreciate the chance to contribute to Portage! It is wonderful to be included amongst the talented writers and artists in this year's edition.

https://portagemagazine.org/adrian-potter-2/

The New York Times and Poetry.

The New York Times has established a strong connection with poetry. It has published countless news and features about poetry & poets over the years.

National Poetry Month is a great time to look at this relationship via this article:  “22 Ways to Teach and Learn About Poetry With The New York Times.” I think even those folks who are tepid towards poetry can find something to enjoy amongst these offerings.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/03/learning/lesson-plans/22-ways-to-teach-and-learn-about-poetry-with-the-new-york-times.html?_r=0

Suggested Reading.

In case you didn’t know, April is National Poetry Month. There are many ways to observe this celebration of verse, but the easiest thing you can do is simply read some poetry.

So this is the perfect time to add some new poetic titles to your “books to be read” list. Check out this diverse list of “15 New Poetry Collections To Read During National Poetry Month” as a starting point. Happy National Poetry Month!

https://www.bustle.com/p/15-new-poetry-collections-to-read-during-national-poetry-month-47908

Breaking Free from Line Break Habits.

If you really look at it, the only distinction between free verse and a prose poem are line breaks. Yet I often read poems where the line breaks don’t do anything that the syntax of the sentence doesn’t already do on its own. Maybe this is just my pet peeve, but I own it and feel the need to talk about it.

Readers hesitate at commas,

and stop briefly at periods.

They’ll even pause when a phrase finishes

before moving on to the next.

So if the line breaks just echo the pauses and stops already inherent in the text, what’s really the point of writing a poem instead of prose?

When it comes time to revise, I challenge myself to think about the line breaks. Sure, some breaks just come together with the ends of phrases and sentences and effectively reinforce those stopping points. But I also consider how line breaks can offer a counterpoint to my syntax, creating tension between the rhythm of my sentences and the rhythm of my lines.

I’ve been working on this personally, and I think it might be a path to better poetry.