Breaking Free from Line Break Habits.

If you really look at it, the only distinction between free verse and a prose poem are line breaks. Yet I often read poems where the line breaks don’t do anything that the syntax of the sentence doesn’t already do on its own. Maybe this is just my pet peeve, but I own it and feel the need to talk about it.

Readers hesitate at commas,

and stop briefly at periods.

They’ll even pause when a phrase finishes

before moving on to the next.

So if the line breaks just echo the pauses and stops already inherent in the text, what’s really the point of writing a poem instead of prose?

When it comes time to revise, I challenge myself to think about the line breaks. Sure, some breaks just come together with the ends of phrases and sentences and effectively reinforce those stopping points. But I also consider how line breaks can offer a counterpoint to my syntax, creating tension between the rhythm of my sentences and the rhythm of my lines.

I’ve been working on this personally, and I think it might be a path to better poetry.

Reporting Live from Portmanteaupia.

A portmanteau is a word formed by the merging of sounds and meanings of two different words. Switched-on-Gutenberg has published my poem dedicated to these faux words - “Reporting Live from Portmanteaupia” – in its Issue 23.

Switched-on Gutenberg: A Global Poetry Journal has been e-publishing the best poetry it can find since 1995. This is the fourth time they’ve published my work, and I definitely appreciate the chance to contribute again…but those who know me know this is all a ploy to get something legitimately published with the word “incognegro” in it…

http://switched-ongutenberg.org/23_Potter_Port

A New Center for Black Poetics.

From Poets & Writers: At the University of Pittsburgh, poets Dawn Lundy Martin, Terrance Hayes, and Yona Harvey recently established the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics -- a creative think tank dedicated to studying, archiving, and promoting the work of African American poets. 

https://www.pw.org/content/a_new_center_for_black_poetics